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cites.es

  1. You are in: CITES
  2. Welcome
  3. Useful Information
  4. FAQ's

 FAQ's

 
- Questions relating to the CITES Convention (questions 1–8)
 
- Questions about CITES permits and certificates in the EU (questions 9–21)
- Other questions relating to CITES controls in Spain (questions 22­–29)

 

  1. How do I know whether a species is protected by the CITES Convention?
  2. What kind of species are listed in the CITES Convention?
  3. Is the CITES Convention applied equally in all countries?
  4. Are there different degrees of control in respect of trade in CITES species?
  5. Do the listings of species that are protected by the Convention ever change?
  6. Where can I obtain a copy of the full list of species included in the CITES Convention?
  7. What is the purpose of issuing CITES documents?
  8. When I am travelling as a tourist to other countries, what should I be aware of?
  9. Where can I obtain a list of the species that cannot be imported into the EU?
  10. What do I need to import a specimen of a species listed in Annex A into the EU?
  11. What do I have to do if I wish to purchase a specimen of a species listed in Annex A in the EU?
  12. What do I need to re-export a specimen of a species listed in Annex A from the EU?
  13. What do I need to import a specimen of a species included in Annex B into the EU?
  14. What documents do I need to acquire a specimen of a species listed in Annex B in the EU?
  15. What do I need to re-export a specimen of a species included in Annex B from the EU?
  16. What do I need to import a specimen of a species listed in Annex C into the EU?
  17. What do I need to re-export a specimen of a species listed in Annex C from the EU?
  18. What do I need to import a specimen of a species listed in Annex D into the EU?
  19. What do I need to re-export a specimen of a species listed in Annex D from the EU?
  20. What do I need to acquire a specimen of a species listed in Annex C or D in the EU? 
  21. What is a CITES Personal Ownership Certificate?
  22. Where can I process an application for a CITES DOCUMENTS, and for registration as a CITES breeding facility in Spain?
  23. Is there any charge for the issue of CITES documents?
  24. Is it mandatory to register with the SOIVRE to breed specimens of CITES species?
  25. Am I obliged to mark captive-bred specimens in order to obtain an EU CITES Certificate?
  26. Am I allowed to import primates to be kept as pets in Spain?
  27. What might happen if I don't have the necessary CITES documents?
  28. Are there some exemptions for private individuals travelling with any goods containing CITES specimens?
  29. What is the EU seal regime?

 

How do I know whether a species is protected by the CITES Convention?
 
First of all, you need to know the scientific name of the species, which is the internationally accepted form of referring to a species. The different levels of protection provided are specified at the level of species, as defined scientifically, and may encompass local populations, or entire families or orders.
 If you only know the common name of a plant or animal, you should start by finding out its accepted scientific name in order to find out its legal status in terms of protection. Bear in mind that sometimes a species may have several synonyms, or common names that vary depending on the region or country concerned, e.g., the species known by the scientific name of Psittacus erithacus is commonly known as jaco, red-tailed African grey parrot, African grey, etc.; Dalbergia nigra wood is known as palisander, Rio rosewood, Bahia rosewood, etc.
You can find the accepted scientific and common names, and also the level of protection afforded the species, on the following websites:
 http://www.cites.org/en/resources/species.html
http://www.speciesplus.net/
 
 
What kind of species are listed in the CITES Convention?
 
The Convention regulates trade in over 34,000 species, including approximately 29,000 plant species (85%), and 5,000 animal species (15%). What all these species have in common is that international trade is, or could become a threat to their survival in the wild; accordingly, trade in these species has to be controlled, or in some cases, prohibited.
 The CITES Convention covers both live and dead specimens, including parts, derivatives, extracts, etc., which means that skins, shells, ivory, seeds, flowers, musical instruments, or crafted objects made from these species are also subject to CITES controls. Protection, therefore, encompasses any product that contains (or claims to contain on its label) parts, ingredients, or derivatives of the relevant CITES species.
Protected animals include mammals (elephants, leopards, dolphins…), birds (eagles, parrots, ducks…), reptiles (tortoises, crocodiles, snakes, chameleons…), amphibians (frogs, salamanders…), arachnids (spiders, tarantulas, scorpions…), insects (beetles, butterflies…), as well as sharks, corals, eels, caviar, leeches, and many other species. Protected plant species include plants (orchids, agaves, cacti, cycads…), and wood (mahogany, palisander, rosewood, palo santo...).
 
 
Is the CITES Convention applied equally in all countries?
 
The Decisions adopted by the Parties to the CITES Convention (which has been signed by the majority of countries) at their periodic meetings —usually referred to as Conferences of the Parties— are binding on its members. Nonetheless, countries may opt to adopt stricter regulations in their countries, e.g., the EU implements stricter CITES regulations in some aspects, which means that trade in certain species is more strictly controlled in the EU; sometimes, protection is afforded to species that are not listed in the Appendices to the Convention.
The 28 EU Member States apply common trade regulations that include CITES regulations. This means that if trade in a species is restricted or prohibited in one of the EU Member States, trade will also be restricted or prohibited in all Member States. However, EU laws do allow Member States to apply national regulations and particularities such as in the case of sanction laws, or the application of national restrictions in respect of certain autochthonous species.
Further information on national, European, and international regulations is available in the "Legislation" section.
 
 
Are there different degrees of control in respect of trade in CITES species?
 
The CITES Convention lists protected species in three Appendices. The highest level of protection is granted to species listed in Appendix I, in which international trade is basically prohibited, except in a few specific cases. The next level of protection is for species listed in Appendix II. International trade, in this case, is subject to control, and may be restricted. Species listed in Appendix III are included at the request of a Party that already regulates trade in the species in its country, and needs the cooperation of other countries to regulate trade therein.
EU regulations define four similar Annexes: A, B, C, and D; Annex A is the most restrictive as regards permitted activities and requirements to be met.
More details on the different CITES Appendices and Annexes are available in the section headed “The Convention” on this website.
 
Do the listings of species that are protected by the Convention ever change
 
Yes, sometimes the listings are modified. Changes in the international trade demand for certain species, scientific studies on wild populations, the recovery of a population as a result of control measures, etc., make it necessary for the listings to be periodically reviewed in order to include, exclude, or modify the level of protection afforded to the listed species.
Accordingly, amendments to Appendices I and II of the Convention are adopted at the meetings of the Conference of the Parties, which take place approximately every two or three years. Amendments to Appendix III may be adopted at the request of a Party, at any time, and notified to the remaining Parties by means of a Notification to the Parties from the CITES Secretariat.
From time to time, the EU publishes Regulations to amend Annexes A, B, C, and D of the Regulation that implements the CITES Convention in the EU. These Annexes take into consideration the amendments adopted by the Conference of the Parties, and also the specificities of the EU.
 
 
Where can I obtain a copy of the full list of species included in the CITES Convention?
 
 
The CITES Secretariat publishes updated versions of Appendices I, II, and III of the CITES Convention on its website:
In the case of EU listings, the most recent Regulation published to include amendments to Annexes A, B, C, and D for implementation of the Convention is Commission Regulation (EU) 1320/2014 of 1 december 2014 amending Council Regulation (EC) 338/97 on the protection of species of wild fauna and flora by regulating trade therein.
 
 
7 What is the purpose of issuing CITES documents?
 
CITES permits and certificates are issued by countries that are Parties to the Convention to authorize the movement of specimens belonging to species that are listed in the Appendices, i.e., to regulate imports, exports and re-exports outside a specific territory. The CITES Convention does not regulate the movement of specimens within a country, given that this is duly regulated by national laws.
CITES documents are required regardless of the authorized purpose of the trade (commercial, scientific, zoological, personal, etc.), or the source of the specimen (from the wild, captive-bred, artificially propagated, pre-Convention, etc.). Depending on which CITES Appendix the species is listed in, and on the legal origin or source of the specimen, trade might be prohibited or highly restricted for certain purposes.
 
 
When I am travelling as a tourist to other countries, what should I be aware of?
 
Many tourist destinations offer exotic souvenirs that are made from animal or plant species; sometimes, even live animals are offered for sale. The simple fact that an item is displayed for sale does not necessarily mean that it has been legally acquired. It is important, therefore, to act responsibly when buying, and to find out the source of the specimen that is on sale, and where applicable, to ensure that you obtain the necessary permits to allow you to take the goods out of the country and bring them into Spain.
The following are examples of goods that are frequently sold, and which may have been obtained from an illegal source according to the provisions of the CITES Convention, or lack the necessary documents: corals, caviar, ivory, parrots, tortoises, butterflies, primates, cacti, orchids, products used in traditional Asian medicine, reptile skin handbags, etc.
In case of doubt, it is preferable to avoid purchasing this type of products in street markets, from street vendors, or establishments that do not seem reliable. By doing so, you will be helping to protect threatened species from unregulated trade.
For further information, consult the Wildlife Souvenirs Guide, published by the EU Commission. The Guide provides specific recommendations for certain tourist destinations.
 
 
9 Where can I obtain a list of the species that cannot be imported into the EU?
 
On an almost yearly basis, the EU publishes a Regulation that includes a list of the wildlife species whose introduction has been suspended in all EU Member States, i.e., no imports of the listed species are allowed, which means that their trade is prohibited in the EU.
Species included in the Suspensions Regulation are basically wildlife species in respect of which it has not been possible to determine whether their removal from the wild is detrimental to the conservation status of the species concerned, and invasive species that might represent en ecological threat to autochthonous wildlife species in the EU.
The most recent regulation published is Commission Implementing Regulation (EU) 578/2013 of 17 June 2013, which suspends the introduction of specimens of certain wildlife species into the EU.
 
 
10 What do I need to import a specimen of a species listed in Annex A into the EU?
 
First, you will need a CITES export permit from the exporting country (i.e., a non-EU country). Prior to importing the goods, you will use a copy of this document to apply for a CITES import permit in the EU destination country. In the case of Spain, the application for this permit can be submitted: directly, at any of the SOIVRE Inspection Services, at the Territorial/Provincial Directorates for Trade; or electronically, by submitting both the application form and payment on-line using a digital certificate.
The actual CITES import should be made at one of the authorized entry/exit points for CITES specimens: in the case of Spain, these are 12 of the Provincial and Territorial Directorates for Trade.
Further, if the wildlife specimens concerned belong to species listed in Appendix I of the CITES Convention, prior to issue of a CITES export permit, you will be required to submit proof that import into the EU will be authorized. In Spain, the document that serves this purpose is the so-called "preliminary import permit".
When importing certain live and/or wild specimens into the EU, you may be required to submit a breeding project in order to justify the need for their import. Such specimens are subject to a stricter level of CITES control; accordingly, it is recommended that the CITES import permit application be submitted at least one month in advance of the specimens arriving in the EU.
It is important to note that the CITES import permit should be authorized PRIOR to the arrival of goods at their destination, and that the import permit is not the only requirement to be fulfilled – there are also a number of health and legal requirements to be met.
 
 
11 What do I have to do if I wish to purchase a specimen of a species listed in Annex A in the EU?
 
If you purchase a specimen of a species listed in Annex A of Regulation (EC) 338/97 in the EU, you will have to submit an original EU CITES Certificate. Photocopies, documents that have been altered (unless any such alteration has been authenticated by the issuing authority), or documents that do not include the relevant annexes, if applicable, are not valid.
There are some exceptions to the EU CITES Certificate requirement: artificially propagated plants, worked antiques such as jewellery, art, or musical instruments acquired before 01.06.1947, and birds of species listed in Annex X of Regulation (EC) 865/2006 that are marked with a closed ring and were captive-bred in the EU; for this exemption to apply, you will need to show evidence to prove that the specimen was obtained legally in accordance with the provisions of CITES. The aforementioned exceptions are only valid within the scope of the EU, and imports, exports, and re-exports of these specimens to or from countries outside the EU will require all relevant CITES permits and certificates.
Before buying a specimen, it is your responsibility to ensure that the CITES document you receive is valid, and that it contains no restrictions regarding the subsequent sale, transfer, breeding activities, exhibition, etc., of the specimen concerned. You should also check the validity of the document, and ensure that any marking requirements, where applicable, are met.
The death of a live animal should be notified to any of the SOIVRE Inspection Services at the Provincial and Territorial Directorates for Trade, and the original Certificate issued in respect of the specimen returned.
 
 
12 What do I need to re-export a specimen of a species listed in Annex A from the EU?
 
You will need a CITES Export Permit (or a re-export certificate), issued by the Management Authority in the EU country from which the specimen will be exported. In the case of Spain, this is issued through the SOIVRE Inspection Services at the Provincial and Territorial Directorates for Trade. Application forms may be submitted at any of the SOIVRE Inspection Services, or online, if you have a digital certificate, in which case you should submit both the application form and payment electronically.
The export or re-export of CITES goods should be made at one of the authorized entry/exit points for CITES specimens, which, in Spain, are 12 of the Provincial and Territorial Directorates for Trade.
Application forms should include all necessary documents, as applicable: EU CITES Certificate, EU import permit, proof of legal origin of the goods, purpose of the trade, markings (marking is mandatory for live vertebrates), etc.
Prior to the goods leaving the exporting country, the exporter/re-exporter is responsible for ensuring that the destination country will authorize the import of CITES specimens into the country. Furthermore, the goods should also comply with any other applicable health and legal requirements.
 
 
13 What do I need to import a specimen of a species included in Annex B into the EU?
 
A CITES export permit is required from the exporting country (i.e., from a country that is not a member of the EU-27) for specimens of species listed in Appendix II of the CITES Convention (and Appendix III in the case of the country that requested their inclusion). A copy of this document is necessary to apply for the relevant CITES import permit in the EU destination country prior to the goods being imported.
In Spain, this permit can be requested directly at the SOIVRE Inspection Services at the Provincial and Territorial Directorates for Trade, or on-line —if you have a digital certificate— by submitting both the application form and payment electronically.
The actual import of CITES goods should be made at one of the authorized introduction/export points for import or export of CITES specimens, which, in Spain, are 12 of the Provincial and Territorial Directorates for Trade.
It is important to remember that the CITES import permit should be authorized PRIOR to the arrival of goods at their destination; it is not enough merely to have submitted the import permit application.
 
 
14 What documents do I need to acquire a specimen of a species listed in Annex B in the EU?
 
If you acquire a specimen of a species included in Annex B of Regulation (EC) 338/97 in the EU, you will have to be able to show proof of legal origin as provided by CITES.
In the case of goods that were previously imported into the EU, you should have the original CITES import permit, or otherwise, a document that confirms their import into the EU, e.g., an invoice showing details of the relevant import permit number, and full identification of the goods.
In the case of specimens originating from the EU, proof will be required by the competent Authorities of their origin from the wild, or otherwise, their origin as captive-bred animals; such proof will require documents or evidence to confirm the origin of parental stock, date of birth, markings, etc.
 
15 What do I need to re-export a specimen of a species included in Annex B from the EU?
 
You will need a CITES export permit (or re-export certificate) issued by the Management Authority of the EU exporting country; in Spain, this document is obtained through the SOIVRE Inspection Services at the Provincial and Territorial Directorates for Trade. Application forms may be submitted directly at any of the SOIVRE Inspection Offices or on-line, if you have a digital certificate, by submitting the application form and payment electronically.
The actual export or re-export of CITES goods should be made at one of the authorized entry/exit points for CITES specimens, which, in Spain, are 12 of the Provincial and Territorial Directorates for Trade (SOIVRE Inspection Services).
Application forms should include all necessary documents, as applicable: EU import permit, proof of legal origin of the goods, information regarding captive-breeding and origin of parental stock, date of birth, markings, etc.
Prior to the goods leaving the exporting country, the exporter/re-exporter is responsible for ensuring that the destination country will authorize the import of the CITES specimens into the country. Furthermore, the goods should also comply with any other applicable health and legal requirements.
 
 
16 What do I need to import a specimen of a species listed in Annex C into the EU?
 
Unlike in the case of species listed in Annexes A and B, there is no need to apply for CITES documents prior to the goods arriving in the EU.
A CITES export permit will be required if the specimens are of a species listed in Appendix III of the CITES Convention and are to be imported from a country of origin that has requested the inclusion of the species in CITES Appendix III. Otherwise, proof of legal origin of the goods will be sufficient, for which purpose a CITES export permit (or re-export certificate) or a certificate of origin issued by the relevant Management Authority is acceptable.
At the point of import into the EU, a CITES Import Notification should be completed on arrival of the goods at one of the authorized EU entry points, which, in the case of Spain, are the 12 SOIVRE Inspection Services at the Territorial/Provincial Directorates for Trade. Goods should also comply with any applicable health and legal requirements.
 
 
17  What do I need to re-export a specimen of a species listed in Annex C from the EU?
 
You will need a CITES export permit (or re-export certificate), issued by the Management Authority in the EU country from which the specimen will be exported. In the case of Spain, this is issued through the SOIVRE Inspection Services at the Provincial and Territorial Directorates for Trade. Application forms may be submitted at any of the SOIVRE Inspection Services, or online, if you have a digital certificate, in which case you should submit both the application form and payment electronically.
The actual export or re-export of CITES goods should be made at one of the authorized entry/exit points for CITES specimens, which, in the case of Spain, are the 12 aforementioned Provincial and Territorial Directorates for Trade.
Application forms should include all necessary documents, as applicable: EU import notification, proof of legal origin of goods, captive-breeding information, i.e., legal origin of parental stock, date of birth, markings, etc.
Prior to the goods leaving the exporting country, the exporter/re-exporter is responsible for ensuring that the destination country will authorize the import of CITES specimens into the country. Furthermore, the goods should also comply with any other applicable health and legal requirements.
 
 
18  What do I need to import a specimen of a species listed in Annex D into the EU?
 
The same applies here as for Annex C: there is no need to apply for a CITES document prior to the goods arriving in the EU.
You will only have to complete the relevant CITES Import Notification on arrival of the goods at one of the authorized EU entry points, which, in the case of Spain, are the 12 SOIVRE Inspection Services at the Territorial/Provincial Directorates for Trade.
 
 
19  What do I need to re-export a specimen of a species listed in Annex D from the EU?
In this case, no specific CITES document is required. Nonetheless, you should have proof of legal origin, e.g., CITES Import Notification, purchase invoice, document issued by a competent authority that specimen was taken from the wild, proof that specimen was captive-bred, etc.
 
 
20 What do I need to acquire a specimen of a species listed in Annex C or D in the EU?
In this case, no specific CITES document is required. Nonetheless, you should have proof of legal origin, e.g., CITES Import Notification, purchase invoice, document issued by a competent authority that specimen was taken from the wild, proof that specimen was captive-bred, etc., which will be required should you subsequently re-export the specimen.
 
 
 
21 What is a CITES Personal Ownership Certificate?
 
A CITES Personal Ownership Certificate is used to facilitate travel to different countries with personally-owned, live, CITES-listed animals (pets) without having to apply for a CITES import or export permit every time you enter or leave the EU; this certificate is valid for a period of three years.
The Certificate is valid for legally acquired, live animals of species listed in Annexes A, B, or C of Regulation (EC) 338/97 that are kept for personal non-commercial purposes (i.e., as pets). The certificate is only valid when each specimen is permanently marked, and the certificate-holder is travelling with the specimen, which should comply with any applicable health or legal requirements.
 
 
22 Where can I process an application for a CITES DOCUMENTS, and for registration as a CITES breeding facility in Spain?
 
You can process applications for CITES permits and certificates at any of the SOIVRE Inspection Services at the Provincial and Territorial Directorates for Trade, where you can also register any breeding facilities for captive-bred CITES specimens, and obtain information about CITES controls in Spain.
Imports, exports, and re-exports of CITES specimens should be carried out at one of the authorized introduction/export points for imports or exports of CITES specimens, which in Spain are 12 of the Provincial and Territorial Directorates.
 
 
23 Is there any charge for the issue of CITES documents?
 
In Spain, CITES fees for processing applications, and issuing CITES permits and certificates are charged according to the fee schedule included in the second additional provision of Law 32/2007. Preliminary Import Permits, Import Notifications, and Protected Species Inspection Certificates (DIEPs) are the only documents that are exempt from payment of these fees.
Full information on the fee schedule is available in the section "CITES Fees" on our website.
 
 
24 Is it mandatory to register with the SOIVRE to breed specimens of CITES species?
 
In the case of species listed in Annex A of Regulation (EC) 338/97, registration with one of the SOIVRE Inspection Services at the Provincial and Territorial Directorates for Trade is mandatory, in order to enable the appropriate controls, and issue of EU CITES Certificates.
In the case of species included in Annex B of Regulation (EC) 338/97, registration with the SOIVRE Inspection Services is not compulsory. However, this does not mean that you are exempt from proving the legal origin of the parental stock and its offspring; accordingly, registration is advisable to facilitate controls and justification of subsequent commercial transactions or CITES exports.
Registration with the SOIVRE Inspection Services is not mandatory for species listed in Annexes C or D of Regulation (EC) 338/97.
 
 
25 Am I obliged to mark captive-bred specimens in order to obtain an EU CITES Certificate?
 
As provided by EU regulations, a live vertebrate of a species listed in Annex A should be marked according to the provisions of Article 66 of Regulation (EC) 865/2006 for an EU CITES Certificate to be issued. As a general rule, birds shall be marked by means of a uniquely marked, seamlessly-closed ring; except for a few duly justified cases, all other live vertebrates shall be marked by means of an ISO-compliant tamper-resistant microchip.
The CITES document that is issued for permanently-marked (closed rings, microchips, tattoos) specimens is a specimen-specific Certificate that allows several transactions to be made throughout EU territory without having to replace the document every time there is a change of ownership. Further, the document has no expiry date, unless there is a change in the circumstances in which the Certificate was originally issued.
Nonetheless, if proof is submitted to the CITES Management Authority that the physical characteristics of a specimen mean that it is not safe to apply an appropriate marking method, a Specific Transaction Certificate may be issued, which shall include special conditions in each case regarding the identification method, expiry date, the need to replace the certificate after each transaction, etc.
 
 
26 Am I allowed to import primates to be kept as pets in Spain?
 
The whole scientific order of Primates is protected by CITES, and the species belonging to this order are included in Appendix I or II of the Convention (Annex A or B of EU Regulations), hence, trade therein is prohibited or regulated. Further, trade in primates is also restricted for health reasons, and is limited to organizations, institutions, or centres that are duly accredited in accordance with the provisions of European and national laws (Directive 92/65/EC, and Royal Decree 1881/1994). These provisions lay down the animal health requirements applicable to certain animal species in intra-Community trade and trade with non-EU countries, and there is no provision for keeping primate species as pets on private premises.
Furthermore, each Autonomous Region is competent to implement regional regulations.
 
 
27 What might happen if I don't have the necessary CITES documents?
 
If you do not have the correct CITES documents for a shipment of CITES goods awaiting import or export at an EU border, the goods may be seized, and a sanctioning procedure will be commenced that could lead to payment of a fine or imprisonment. Similar rules are applied at a national level in the case of CITES specimens being sold without the required documents. For further information, see the section on Sanction Laws.
 
 
28 Are there some exemptions for private individuals travelling with any goods containing CITES specimens?
 
For certain items of CITES species listed in Annex B (in no case, Annex A) of Regulation (EC) 338/97, no CITES documents are required for introduction, export, or re-export, provided that said items are personal or household effects for non-commercial purposes travelling in the personal luggage of travellers to or from non-EU countries. This exception applies solely to CITES specimens for non-commercial purposes; accordingly, it is not applicable to specimens purchased via the Internet, imports, exports, or re-exports made by companies or legal persons:
 
a)   (caviar of sturgeon species (Acipenseriformes spp.), up to a maximum of 125 grams per person, in containers that are individually marked in accordance with Article 66(6) of Regulation (EC) 865/2006 ;
b)   rainsticks of Cactaceae spp., up to three per person;
c)    dead worked specimens of Crocodylia spp., excluding meat and hunting trophies, up to four per person, (this includes manufactured goods or garments containing crocodile skin, e.g., bags, belts, coats, etc. A pair of shoes is considered as two specimens; thus, the maximum allowance in this case is two pairs of shoes.);
d)   shells of Strombus gigas (known as queen conch or pink conch), up to three per person;
e)   Hippocampus spp. (seahorses) up to four dead specimens per person;
f)    shells of Tridacnidae spp. (giant clams) up to three specimens per person not exceeding three kg in total, where a specimen may be one intact shell or two matching halves.
g) specimens of agarwood (Aquilaria spp. and Gyrinops spp.) — up to 1 Kg woodchips, 24 ml oil, and two sets of beads or prayer beads (or two necklaces or bracelets) per person.
If these goods are exported or re-exported to a non-EU country, the destination country should also accept these exceptions, taking into consideration that they are granted under internal EU regulations.
 
29 What is the EU seal regime?
 
It is a legislative framework, put in place in 2009, which introduced a general ban on the placing of seal products on the EU market. The placing on the EU market is only allowed for seal hunts traditionally conducted by the Inuit and other indigenous communities which contribute to the subsistence of these communities. In this case, the seal product must be accompanied by an original Attesting Document confirming that the conditions for this exception have been met. More information here.
 
Subd. Gral. de Inspección, Certificación y Asistencia Técnica del Comercio